History

1967

  • Nassau County Family Court Judge Elizabeth Bass Golding learned that one-half of the children in the State Psychiatric Hospital system were there simply due to lack of suitable community-based viable, home alternatives for youth.

 

1968

  • Nassau County Family Court Judge Elizabeth Bass Golding formed a committee to help the “Lost Children”.
  • The Youth Hostels Act, passed by New York State Legislature in 1969 amended Article 1.03, Section 21 of the New York State Mental Hygiene Law. The phrase  “Mentally Retarded” was changed to read “Mentally Disabled”. The Mental Hygiene Law was amended to provide budget appropriation

1969

  • Hope For Youth was founded as a not-for-profit voluntary agency and incorporated under the laws of the State of New York and licensed by the New York State Department of Social Services and the New York State Office of Mental Health to operate group homes for youth.

1971

  • The agency’s first group home was opened in the North Bellmore community using a live-in staffing model. This home accepted seven boys from Northeast Nassau Psychiatric Hospital and Sagamore Children’s Center.

1973

  • A second Hope For Youth group home opened in Seaford. Seven boys were accepted from the Nassau Family Court and the Nassau County Department of Social Services.

 

1976

  • The third group home, known as the Plainview Home opened.
  • Hope For Youth accepted referrals directly from the Probation Department of the Family Court and the Commissioner of Social Services for placement.

1981

  • Hope for Youth opened it’s fifth group home known as the Richard Jacobs Group Home in North Babylon. This was Hope For Youth’s first home in Suffolk County.

 

1989

  • The Farmingdale group home opened.

 

1995

1997

1999

  • First Hope For Youth certified Foster Family
  • First child placed in Hope For Youth therapeutic foster home, transferred from a Hope For Youth group home.
  • First adoption of a child by a Hope For Youth foster family.

2000

  • Acquires a Bay Shore home in which to operate the Family Ties program. Hope For Youth is the only Long Island program and one of 2 New York State programs which decreases the number of large sibling groups that require separation at the time of removal from the biological home.

2001

  • Hope For Youth opens the Non-Secure Detention program in Amityville. The Non-Secure Detention (NSD) Center is licensed by the New York State Office of Children and Family Services and provides temporary short-term services in a stabilizing, supportive and therapeutic setting for JD and PINS youth.

2002

  • Family Ties accepted its first sibling group.

2003

  • HFY opens Suffolk County Intensive Case Management (ICM) program. The goal is to prevent immediate removal from home and foster  care placement.

2006

  • The Nassau County Intensive Case Management Program (ICM) is funded by the New York State Office of Children and Family Services to replicate our highly successful Suffolk County program.

2007

  • Hope For Youth acquires the building located at 201 Dixon Avenue, Amityville and moves administrative offices from 15 Ireland Place. Three programs in three separate locations are consolidated and relocated to the newly acquired building.

2008

2011

2012

  • Hope For Youth organizes the first Run For Hope on October 13, 2012.
  • The “Hard to Place” group home for adolescent girls opens.
  • Hope For Youth is selected as the dedicated provider of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for the PINS Diversion Population for the Town of Babylon.

2015

  • Hope For Youth begins the Sibling Reunification Program.
  • Hope for Youth expands the Multi-Dimensional Family Therapy Program to include new towns under the Supervision and Treatment Program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

  • Hope for Youth launches the Town of Babylon Prevention Program

  • Hope For Youth opens the doors of the Suffolk County Runaway & Homeless Youth Shelter.

2017

  • Hope For Youth implements Wendy’s Wonderful Kids, a signature program of the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption.
  • The community-based program Health Homes debuts, serving Nassau and Suffolk Counties.

2018

  • Hope For Youth is selected as the dedicated provider of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for the PINS Diversion Population for Nassau County.

2019

  • Hope For Youth celebrates fifty years of service to Long Island youth and families.
  • Hope For Youth Riverhead office opens to serve East End of Long Island.
  • FOCUS launched June 1st, servicing Suffolk County. Families Overcoming Crisis through Unified Services is an initiatve between Suffolk County Family Court, Department of Social Services’ Child Protective Services, Hope For Youth and additional agencies.